Redress Number Vs Known Traveler Number: What’s The Difference?

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A redress number and a known traveler number are commonly confused. However, they are two very different numbers. Let's examine the differences between a redress number and a known traveler number.

A redress number is a unique identifier assigned to an individual subjected to adverse security screening in the past. This number allows the individual to avoid being unnecessarily targeted for additional screening in the future.

On the other hand, a known traveler number is given to approved travelers giving them expedited screening benefits.

As you can see, there are critical differences between the two numbers. In this article, we will take a closer look at these two airport security numbers and what they mean for travelers.

In addition, we will answer other questions about going through TSA, so read on!

Difference between access of known traveler number and readress number (2), Redress Number Vs Known Traveler Number: What's The Difference?

Is A Known Traveler Number The Same As A Redress Number?

Over the last 20 years, airport security has taken extra measures to ensure the safety of air travelers. This has included longer lines, more screenings, and additional measures for high-risk individuals.

The goal is to ensure that everyone who steps on an airplane is safe and not a threat to other passengers.

Known Traveller Number

Denver International Airport on typical Sunday morning

The TSA has implemented several programs to help streamline the screening process for low-risk travelers, including the known traveler number [KTN] program.

The KTN program is available to U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents who have undergone a background check and have been determined to be low-risk travelers.

Individuals with a known traveler number can use expedited screening lanes at select airports and are not required to remove shoes, belts, or light outerwear during the screening process.

In addition, known travelers are not required to remove laptops or 3-1-1 compliant liquids from carry-on bags.

Travelers with KTN can have children under 12 and adults over 75 included in their expedited screening privileges. You can apply to the KTN program on the TSA precheck website. 

Redress Number

A redress number is commonly confused with a known traveler number, but they are two very different things.

A redress number is given by the Homeland Security Travel Redress Inquiry Program [DHS TRIP] to individuals subjected to adverse security screening.

For example, if you have been delayed, denied boarding, or subjected to extra screening in the past, you may be eligible for a redress number.

This number will allow you to avoid being unnecessarily targeted for additional screening in the future.

While anyone can apply for a redress number, not everyone will be eligible. Keep reading as we will go into more detail about how to apply for a redress number.

Blurred Airport security check at gates with metal detector and scanner

How Do You Apply For A Redress Number?

Before you apply for a redress number, you should ask yourself if you are eligible. The DHS TRIP program is designed to help people who have been incorrectly identified as a security threat in the past.

For example, if you have been denied boarding an airplane or into another border crossing because you were flagged as a security risk, you may be eligible for a redress number.

In addition, if you have been repeatedly subjected to extra screening at the airport, you may be eligible for a redress number.

However, not everyone will be able to get a redress number. For example, if you have been denied boarding or subjected to extra screening due to a criminal record or were noticeably intoxicated, these are not reasons to apply for a redress number. 

If you think you may be eligible for a redress number, you can apply online through the DHS TRIP website. The application process is simple and only takes a few minutes to complete.

After you complete the application, it will go into review. From there, it can take 30 business days or more to get a response from DHS to determine whether you are eligible for a redress number.

Why Do People Randomly Get TSA PreCheck?

If you have seen people in the TSA PreCheck line and wondered how they got there, you are not alone. While some people may have applied and been approved for TSA PreCheck, others may have been selected randomly.

TSA randomizes passengers for PreCheck may be to increase the number of people who are enrolled in the program. By selecting people at random, TSA can hopefully have more travelers enroll in PreCheck, which can increase revenue.

Since the program is $78 for five years, it is not cheap. With that said, if more travelers can get a feel for how much time and hassle it can save, TSA may be able to convince more people to sign up.

If you are selected for PreCheck, you will be notified at the airport. You will be directed to the PreCheck line, where you can enjoy the expedited screening.

Overhead sign showing security check point lanes designated for first class and TSA Precheck passengers

Is Getting A Known Traveler Number Worth It?

Getting a known traveler can have its benefits. However, whether or not you should pay for one will depend on how often you travel.

For example, if you rarely fly, you may not find the $78 price tag worth it. Now, for those who travel for a living or business, the $78 may be worth it, as you will use the PreCheck line more often.

The same can be said for those who frequently travel with young children or elderly adults. If you are constantly going through the airport with your family, the ability to have them all included in PreCheck may make the $78 price tag worth it.

Traveling with children can be stressful, so using PreCheck can help take some of the stress out of travel.

It is up to you whether or not you think getting a known traveler number is worth it. Since it's only for five years, you may decide to sign up and see how often you use it.

How Can I Find My Known Traveler Number?

When booking airline reservations, you may have noticed a field to enter your known traveler number. You can leave this field blank if you do not have a known traveler number.

If you have a known traveler number but cannot remember it, there are a few ways to look it up. First, you can log into the Trusted Traveler Program website. You can view all your account information, including your known traveler number.

Another way to look up your known traveler number is on your NEXUS, SENTRI, or Global Entry card. The nine-digit number will be on the back of each card and will start with 15, 98, or 99.

How Much Time Do You Save With A Known Traveler Number?

The amount of time you save with a known traveler number will depend on the airport you are flying into and out of.

For example, if you fly into a smaller airport that does not have PreCheck lanes, you will not save time. Since few passengers have PreCheck at smaller airports, the regular security line is often just as fast.

On the other hand, if you are flying out of JFK airport in New York, you can expect to save a significant amount of time by having PreCheck. These large airports will have long lines in the regular security lane, so having PreCheck can help you avoid a long wait.

It also depends on what time you arrive at the airport. The earlier you show up to major flights. If you show up before the TSA lines get too long, you may not save much time with PreCheck.

If you arrive at the airport and find that the regular security line is very long, having PreCheck can help you get through security much faster.

Sometimes it's hard to know how much time you will save with a known traveler number.

Travelers in long lines at Denver International Airport going thru the Transportation Security Administrat

Why Do I Keep Getting Flagged By TSA?

Getting flagged for additional screening can be frustrating, especially if you have a flight to catch. However, there are a few reasons why you may be getting flagged.

First, it could be because of something in your profile. The TSA keeps a watchlist of people that may pose a threat to air travel. If your name or information matches someone on the watchlist, you may be flagged for additional screening.

Another reason you may be getting flagged is that you didn't abide by TSA rules in the past. For example, if you have tried to bring a banned item through security in the past, you may be flagged for additional screening.

You may also be getting flagged because of something random. The TSA uses a computer algorithm to randomly select people for additional screening. This is done to help keep air travel safe.

Sometimes you can have bad luck and keep getting flagged for additional screening.

Final Thoughts

Difference between access of known traveler number and readress number (2), Redress Number Vs Known Traveler Number: What's The Difference?

While they are two different traveler numbers, your known traveler number and redress number serve similar purposes. Both can help you get through airport security faster and make travel less stressful.

Made it to the end? Here are other articles you might find helpful:

Domestic Vs. International Flight: What's The Difference? [Inc. Tips And Advice]

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